26 April, 2007

Who?

"First I sits myself down. Then I work myself up. Then I throw in my darks. Then I pulls out my lights."


"If the picturesqueness of objects be increased in proportion to their roughness of surface and intricacy of motion, two spiders, such as the avicularia, not to descend to too diminutive a scale, caressing or attacking each other, must, in point of picturesqueness, have greatly the advantage over every athletic or amorous symplegma left by the ancients."


"With regard to ourselves, the barbarous though then perhaps useful rage of image-breakers in the seventeenth century seems much too gratuitously propagated as a principle in an age much more likely to suffer from irreligion than superstition. A public body inflamed by superstition suffers, but it suffers from the ebullitions of radical heat, and may return to a state of health and life; whilst a public body plunged into irreligion is in a state of palsied apathy, the cadaverous symptom of approaching dissolution."

(No googling!)

8 comments:

Herr Ziffer said...

Mary Shelley?

Conrad H. Roth said...

No. (A point of clarification: the person to be identified is the artist (who is also the author of the quotations), not the sitter.)

Pedro Eduardo said...

No idea whatsoever. But let me try: William Hogarth?

Brian said...

Gulley Jimson?

John B. said...

Thanks for the clarification--the sitter in that first portrait looks a little like John Waters.

My guess: Oscar Wilde??

Conrad H. Roth said...

A clue: This is an artist living sometime between Hogarth and Wilde, writing in English, despite not having a native command of the language.

Pedro Eduardo said...

Although I haven't read his prose, I'll be trying with Dante Gabriel Rossetti then. (Could that be Jane Morris?)

Conrad H. Roth said...

OK, looks like nobody's going to get it. Thanks for guessing.

It was Henry Fuseli. Fine drawings, eh?